4 Secrets Every Teen Keeps From Their Parents

4 Secrets Every Teen Keeps From Their Parents
byFYA

We’re entering a point in our lives where everything and anything starts to feel possible. We’re working our way through high school, growing up, gaining maturity and slowly, kinda, becoming adults. But before that, we need to live a little…

The number of new, stimulating opportunities that open up in front of us is exciting. And us – being teens and feeling like we own the world – want in on the fun.

We crave action, and the thrill of new experiences: freedom, relationships and soirees. We’re entering a time in our lives where we can see the freedoms that come with being an adult like a light at the end of the tunnel. It’s an exciting feeling. But at the same time our parents are trying to treat us as kids, at least for a little longer.

Yes, they want the best for us. Yes, they are only thinking of our safety and wellbeing, but for the sake of simplicity and to avoid being at each other’s throats in an argument that could just result in “no, you can’t go to that friends house, see that person or do that thing” sometimes we keep things to ourselves.

With that in mind, here are some common secrets we think a lot of teens like us keep from their parents and why we keep them.

Parents… Please stop reading here.

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Young people… Hello.

What grades we get at school.

Not everyone has hidden their report cards or even edited them to please their parents (trust me, I do know that there are people who have) but we’ve all had a time where we don’t mention a certain test because we could’ve done better. Having parents tell us we can do better or that we didn’t try enough really gets us.

Getting a lower score than usual doesn’t mean we “didn’t try hard enough.” We always try, really hard. It can mean that the test was harder than usual, or that we struggle on this topic, or that we just didn’t have enough time to study. All this is on top of the pressure of getting a good ATAR, courses, and planning for the future. If our parents could concentrate more on how much we’ve improved and what we could do to improve rather than our actual mark, we would feel better about our score and be encouraged to do better next time.

The status of our relationships.

We keep hearing a lot of “No relationships in high school” or “You’re too young for a relationship” but our parents saying that just makes us more interested. Let us experience as we grow, stop shielding us from things.

 

Our opinions on issues.

I don’t know about you, but I don’t always agree with my parents on issues. There’s a generation gap, how can we be expected to agree with everything they have to announce on every topic?

Sure, there was a time in our lives when we just listened to whatever you had to say. We didn’t know any better. But now sometimes we do, and sometimes our opinions are different from yours and yours are not always more valid just because you’re older than us.

How we use social media.

As we witness technological advances, we rely more on technology to connect with our friends and families who may be overseas. Social media and phones have just become a part of everyday life. It has come to a point where not being on social media for a day would stop you from being updated with news from friends and around the world. We use technology to our advantage to share bits of our lives with others and look at bits of other people’s lives and limiting this would only cut off our connections.

Our parents think we’re anti-social, with our heads in our screens. But we’re being social!

We don’t love keeping secrets. Maybe if our parents were a little more accepting of our failures, a bit more supportive of our own ability to make decisions or a smidge more understanding of things that are new or different we wouldn’t have to.

That’s it. Thanks for listening.

 

This article was written by students through out Work Inspirations program during their time with us at FYA. Props to them.